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Southwest Boeing 737 800 Seat Map

southwest 737 800 seating

Seat Specifications

Class Pitch Width Row Seats
Economy 32-33″ 17″ 1-30 175

Amenities Key

Amenities Key seat map

737 800 Southwest Overview

April 2012 saw Southwest Airlines introduce their upgraded services, starting with the design of the 737 800 Southwest seats. They named the new cabin the Evolve Interior, indicating the company’s steps towards going green. The 737 800 now sports more comfortable economy class seats made from environmentally friendly leather. They also included better back support, headrest, and softer cushions for a superior flying experience.

The 737 800 can accommodate 175 passengers. To improve the 737 800 seating, Southwest has increased the legroom in front of the seats and allowed them to pitch 32 inches. These modifications ensure passengers have more wiggle space. Thanks to slanted overhead compartments and Sky Interior design, the cabin feels more spacious.

It is not possible to reserve Southwest 737 800 seating. The company assigns passengers seats based on their check-in times. So early boarders will have a better choice of seats in the different zones in the aircraft.

The Boeing 737 800 does not have entertainment provisions like LCD screens, radio channels, and portable devices. However, the company gives passengers access to the Beats Music streaming platform and in-flight internet for $8 per device. Passengers can watch movies and TV channels on their connected devices.

The cabin crew will serve pretzels and light refreshments, and non-alcoholic drinks are part of the package. Flyers who want wines, spirits, and alcoholic drinks can pay for them during the flight.

Southwest 737 800 Seating

Economy

According to the Southwest Boeing 737 800 seat map, there are no First Class or Business class seats. The cabin sports 175 economy seats; however, some provide a better seating experience than others. Seats 1D, 1E, 1F, and 2A, 2B, 2C are slimmer than others because they have tray tables connected to the stationary armrests. They also lack floor storage at the beginning and end of flights.

Seats 2A, 2B, and 2C have more legroom, making them more popular among regular flyers. The left extreme of the 9th row and the right extreme of the 10th row lack windows, making seats 9A and 10F less popular. Seats 13A to 13F don’t recline because they are in front of the exit row; the same applies to seats 14A to 15F. However, the 14th and 15th rows get extra legroom.

Like the first row on the Southwest Boeing 737 800 seat map, 15B to 15E are narrower because of the stationary armrests and tray tables. On the other hand, the 16th row seats have the most space for passengers’ legs and don’t sacrifice reclining angle. The only seats in this row that don’t guarantee the best experience are 16A and 16F because they are thinner due to the attached tray tables and stationary armrest.

The Southwest 737 800 seating experience in the rest of the seats in the cabin is similar. Only 29C, 29D, and the last row seats give a less comfortable flying experience because of their closeness to the toilets and the gallery. They also don’t pitch up to 32 inches, making flyers see them as bad seats.